Julia Daviy is bringing fashion into the future with 3D printed clothing

in Exclusive Interviews/Lifestyle/Photo Shoot

Julia Daviy is a fashion designer with a high-tech twist. She creates 3D-printed clothing that is both fashionable and functional, with an eye towards sustainability and ethical production. With patterns from lace to leather, Daviy creates clothing that is cruelty-free, recyclable, and classically chic.

This revolution will re-empower women around the world, and begin to repair the torn fabric of our society.

Julia Daivy photographed by Vita Zamchevska.

The myths of the weaving goddess, of Athena, the Fates and the Celestial Mother, remind us that women once wove our society together. Today we are at the start of a revolution in fashion, as 3D printing transforms the industry in the same way digital technologies have transformed and disrupted many other industries. This revolution will re-empower women around the world, and begin to repair the torn fabric of our society.”

Daviy is also a co-founder of the Green Economy Institute in Eastern Europe, and sits on the boards of other organisations in the field of clean technology. Her interest in combating climate change and reducing the impact of fashion on the environment spurred her to begin studying 3D printing technologies as a way to reduce chemical pollution, energy consumption, material waste and the exploitation of animals in the fashion industry. Using leather in the clothing industry is not very good ethically,” says Daviy. “It also looks old fashioned. Why use a crocodile pattern when you can use any kind of pattern, such as a coral surface?

“I envision a near future where local communities all around the world are enriched by 3D printed fashion. Where women can leave the factories and sweatshops, and work with affordable 3D printing equipment to create unique fashions for the people of their villages, towns and neighborhoods. A future in which the women who make our clothing are no longer exploited, but are once again respected, honored and loved.”

Her collection of 3D-printed clothing, The Liberation Collection, premiered during New York Fashion Week 2018. It’s the first collection of its type in the US, and Daviy is hoping to change the perception of 3D printing from a novelty to a practical way to create wearable clothing that is more ethical than leather without sacrificing style.

Photo: Olya Helga

The Pink Coral Neon Skirt

Julia used the 3-dimensional pattern similar to a snakeskin and parametric lines of different height, inspired by the shapes of Fungia Coral and sea animal species skin patterns.

The Pure Nature Suit

A white top and white-and-neon-green skirt. Here you will see a wide-use in architecture organic pattern (so-called Voronoi pattern). The suit is super flexible. It’s lining made from premium eco-friendly fabric produced from recycled fishing nets.

Many of the pieces in Julia’s collection are inspired by coral and other marine textures, which the 3D-printing process allows her to replicate in a way that cannot be done with traditional clothing techniques. A dress in a classic shape with a bold black-and-white pattern inspired by sea urchin exoskeletons exemplifies her approach to design.

The Lace Mini Skirt

Meet the world’s first 3D-printed lace skirt. Inspired by the shapes of coral reef and a skirt from one of the most popular looks of Carrie Bradshaw, this skirt matches a wide variety of modern looks.

Parametric Coral Pleated Dress

Inspired by sea reefs and especially by Fungia Coral, Julia Daviy created a dress, which despite its parametric structure and being 3d printed looks like a real wearable dress, good for cocktail parties or special occasions.

The Polka Dot Exoskeleton Dress

Inspired by exoskeletons of sea urchins, Julia Daviy created a ready-to-3d-wear classic dress with 3-dimensional polka dots, which are pretty similar to the round barbed in the closer look.

The Parametric Skin Suit

Julia used the 3-dimensional pattern similar to a snakeskin and parametric lines of different height, inspired by the shapes of Fungia Coral and sea animal species skin patterns.

The Fragility Dress

Meet the world’s first 3D-printed lace skirt. Inspired by the shapes of coral reef and a skirt from one of the most popular looks of Carrie Bradshaw, this skirt matches a wide variety of modern looks.

3D-printing technology has been evolving quickly in recent years, going from something that was hugely expensive and time consuming to something much more accessible. While the large-format printers that Daviy uses are still very expensive and it takes a long time to create an entire piece of clothing, she believes that the issues of time and cost will continue to be improved and 3D printing will become a viable form of clothing production.

To learn more about Julia Daivy visit her official website.

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